Andy Collier in real life, greenspree was a take on an old nickname and also a kind of motto for what I want to accomplish with my life. I have worked in construction, architecture and the civil service most of my adult life with 7 years as a contract administrator for an architectural firm. It was there that I became interested in environmentally friendly design and alternative energy. It was also where I met my future wife and learned that we both shared a deep unshakable respect and love of the natural world and it’s rhythms.

When we married, and even before hand, we decided that waste, pollution and consumption were going to be kept as far from our lives as possible. This shaped our decisions on where to live, what kind of house to build, what kind of car to drive, what and how to eat and what our future goals were to be.

Since building our straw bale home I have developed a keen interest in making things, especially wooden kitchen ware such as spoons and bowls; knives, sheaths and knife handles; and leather goods.  I make most of my products by hand using traditional tools such as the axe, knife, hammer, anvil, pole lathe, draw knife and spoke shave. Most of the wooden products I make show tool marks which I would sand out but have chosen to leave evident, adding character and having a terrific hand and mouth feel compared to a sanded finish.

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  • January 19, 2016 at 3:17 pm
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    Andy,

    How are thing in the PEI? Not much of a winter yet for us. Although it is 20 F and snowy now.

    I have been following Jarrod Stone Dahl’s blog. He has been making rapid in roads into turning end grain cups on the pole lathe. With handles no less!?!? How do you “cut” and not hit the handle in the process? I can not wrap my head around how you turn and make a side handle at the same time. Any idea how this is done? I am not going to do this right away. I still only have a hand fool of bowls under my belt. But the technique intrigues me. Here is a photo (Check email) of how he set up his lathe to turn end grain. Share our thoughts? Oh and by the way, Marcella is six weeks old now. We are very happy to have her.

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